Cape Otway, Victoria

Set against the geological drama of the Great Ocean Road and the rain forest of Great Otway National Park is the earliest lighthouses on the mainland. Built in 1848, Cape Otway Lighthouse is the spot for magnificent clifftop vistas and a huge dosage of history, if you are looking for something different to Lorne Accommodation. Not only has it long been a beacon of security on the treacherous Victorian coast, however it was central to the advancement of telegraph interactions in Australia and did time as a conveyor of radar tricks throughout World War II. The site features a museum in the previous telegraph station, a coffee shop, the old radar bunker, a native cultural centre and 3 heritage homes that can accommodate groups of approximately 16.

apollo bay accommodation


Troubridge Island, South Australia

3 hours’ drive from Adelaide, on a sandy shoal in St Vincent Gulf, stands a lighthouse that resembles something from a fairy tale. The 160-year old Troubridge Island lighthouse was the very first in Australia made of cast iron, shipped out in pieces from Britain and put together by cranes in South Australia. Troubridge is a leading spot for twitchers– it’s a breeding place for black-faced cormorants and crested terns and is the home of a large colony of little penguins. Visitors have actually become fans of resident seal Sammy, who prefers to sun himself on the close-by beach. The heritage-listed lighthouse keepers’ cottage can accommodate up to 12.

Low Head Pilot Station, Tasmania

A long distance away from Apollo Bay accommodation, North of Launceston and overlooking the Bass Strait is Low Head Pilot Station and historic precinct– and exactly what a pretty sight it is, with its candy-striped lighthouse and cluster of historic buildings. Low Head’s destinations include Australia’s 3rd earliest light station, a museum, nests of little blue and fairy penguins plus sandy beaches. Visitors are spoiled for option with accommodation: there are 9 brought back 19th-century cottages appropriate for groups of up to 9. Low Head’s fog horn, said to be the only one of its kind still operating on the planet, booms out each Sunday at noon, and the nearby 170km Tamar Valley Wine Route takes in 32 vineyards.

  1. Lorne

Lorne is a stunning town located right on the Great Ocean Road and was our favourite town to stay in, in some great Lorne accommodation along the journey.

It has a certain beauty with terrific coffee shops, special stores, galleries and Otway National Park is on your doorstep. Lorne is only 140 kilometres south of Melbourne and this restaurant swells with people over the Christmas holidays.

Take pleasure in a walk on the beach, a bike ride along the foreshore out to the pier, have a coffee at Lorne Beach Pavilion and get a hamburger from The Bottle of Milk– delicious!

We stayed at the Mantra Apartments which were incredible and right on the beach.

romantic getaways

  1. Teddys Lookout

A brief drive up the hill behind Lorne is Teddys Lookout. Drive up to the picnic area at the end of George Street and stroll a short range to enjoy the magnificent views of the Great Ocean Road from the lookout.

There’s a 45-minute walk you can do here.

  1. The Lorne– > Apollo Bay Drive

Our preferred stretch of road was from Lorne to Apollo Bay. Be prepared to take a lot of photos. This stretch of road has a few of the most picturesque scenery in the region. The Great Ocean Road hugs the cliff-face as it winds through the Great Otway National Park and rolling farmland.

  1. Apollo Bay Eco Hostel

Apollo Bay is completely placed about half-way along the Great Ocean Road and surrounded by Otway National Park State Forest and acres of green farmland.

Trying to find an inexpensive and family-friendly location to stay? The Apollo Bay YHA Eco Hostel was a charming location to base ourselves for a couple of days.

Extremely relaxing ambiance with terrific kitchen facilities, lounge spaces and a roof deck to delight in a sunup. This is not a party hostel, no YHA homes are, and we met a great deal of good families and solo tourists here who were just after peaceful Apollo bay accommodation.

You know, I think the most important benefit about traveling is not the city or country that is discovered, but the friends with whom you share these moments. These are the people around us that make the experience better or sometimes worse. But what if you travel alone?


Of course, the obvious answer is to make friends

The problem is that for many people it is very difficult to make friends only once on the road, and out of their little comfort zone.
The trips have taught me to become much more open and sociable in everyday life and to go towards other people. I got through it meet lots of great people and live totally unexpected. Some of these meetings were even transformed into lasting friendships.

Today I would like to give you some tips on how to meet people and make friends when traveling alone. I will list you specifically a couple of lessons I’ve learned during my travels.

  • Forget all your preconceived ideas

This is the best advice I can give you. Many people start with countless  false reasons by which they could not do certain things. They feel too old (or too young, too timid, etc.) to try and do this or that.
I have often heard this phrase:

“I’ll never go to a hostel because it’s filled with teenagers ”

Many of the tips I am about to enumerate here appear also perhaps for the younger of you but I’m used to making friends from 18 to 70 years! So do not put a barrier of this type in your friendships. You can always learn something from everyone you meet, whatever their age is.

  • Stay in a hostel

When traveling alone, hostels are undoubtedly the best place to meet people. I can assure you  they are filled with people of very different ages. You always fall naturally on the cliché of the young fighter in full world tour . But you will also come across families who choose to go traveling on a budget.

The little secret to remember about hostels is that they often offer single rooms. This way you are staying as in the hotel while enjoying the benefits of living in the community clean hostels.
Now, we must also learn a little upstream before booking. I remember during my trip to Dublin I was going through the Hostel Bookers website to see what people thought of a particular place. The one that had received the best critics was in a place I never knew and whose atmosphere was really great. Generally, you will find very detailed reviews and true to life.

  • Use your favorite hobby to meet peopletrekking

A site like MeetUp can be a very good tool. You will find many groups formed around a single passion, a sport or other activity. So if you’re a fan of trekking  you can  easily find a local group for the practice. One of the fastest ways to meet new people is to share the same passion.